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Top Papal Adviser Charged With Sexual

Top papal adviser charged with sexual assault in blow to Vatican


Australian police filed charges against Pope Francis' lawyer on Thursday for several historic sex offenses. The dilemma happened to the Pope, who vowed zero tolerance for such crimes.

Cardinal George Pell is the Vatican's deputy finance minister and the highest-ranking Vatican official accused of sexual assault.

Police in Victoria, Australia, said they are facing "multiple charges against historic sex crimes" from several complaints.

Police also did not disclose charges against Pell, nor did they claim that the victim's age was a crime.


The Australian Catholic Church said in a statement that Pell strongly denied the allegations and said he planned to "come back to Australia and" make his name clear. "

"He is looking forward to the day in court and will defend the charges," he said in a statement. The doctor also said he would advise on a travel plan.

Pell has pestered the victims in a government investigation of institutional child abuse in Australia last year.

He was ordered to appear at the Melbourne Court of Justice on July 18. The cardinal was scheduled to announce his statement on Thursday in the Vatican.

The recent development of the long-standing Pell incident has forced the pope's pressure to force him to slaughter the abusing bishop, or to put pressure on the guards.

Francis told reporters last year that the Australian Justice Department will wait until he enters Pell, and since 2014, the treasurer must not be tried by the media.

"The judicial system is ongoing and can not be judged before the judicial system," the Justice Department said. "I will tell you when the judicial system is over."

'Catastrophic choice'
Pell said in an Australian survey last year that the church refused to believe the abused child, refused to turn the diocese into a sacrifice in the diocese, and relied heavily on the priest's counsel.

Francis' attempt to eradicate sexual abuse in the church has been a stumbling block.

Marie Collins, the most non-member of the Vatican's committee on abuse, was frustrated earlier this year because of "shameful" resistance to change within the Vatican.

Church sexual abuse was revealed in 2002 when the US bishops in Boston revealed that they had moved abusers instead of dissolving abusers. Similar scandals have been found around the world and tens of millions of dollars have been paid in rewards.

Thousands of cases have been uncovered so that long-silent victims can be revealed through the investigation.

"I suspect that (the charges against Pell) is shocking to the Vatican and the Pope himself," said Thomas P. Doyle, his report on cleric abuse that led to the discovery of concealment. Case in Boston.

According to previous popes, Vatican, the sovereign state of central Rome, protected the people that other nations wanted.

In the early 1980s, the Vatican demanded fraud by Archbishop Paul Marcinkus, who was the head of the Vatican Bank. He wanted to question the fraudulent bankruptcy of the private Italian bank.

The sexist discrimination scandal sprang from the diocese and lived in the Italian capital for more than fifteen years, and Boston's Cardinal Bernard Law moved to Rome.

The victims were indignant when the court (currently 85 years old and retired) performed Pope John Paul II's job as a high priest in the Roman Cathedral.

But Francis was difficult for Jozef Wesolowski, a former archbishop charged with sexual intercourse with minors in the Dominican Republic serving as pope ambassador.

Wesolowski was recalled in 2013, arrested and arrested in the Vatican in 2014, but died just before the trial began in 2015.

Victims' support groups say that the successive pope failed to grasp the gravity of the situation.

"It would not be naive to assume that we are relieved," Neil Woodger, vice president of the In Good Faith Foundation, said of the charges against Pell.

"They will also have some difficulties," he said. "I think it is important to keep justice, and justice is for everyone."

The Wagar Foundation says there were 460 victims of Catholic church abuse in Australia.

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